d/a magazine

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Photo: Sandra Chávez/Inside Out Rap Comunidade

 

Articles marked with (M) are exclusive to Sustaining Members of Dharma/Arte.
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THE EYE KNOWS NO BORDERS

Text: Bill Scheffel; photos: Sandra Chávez & Inside Out Rap Comunidade
“For each man the other is ‘other,’ someone of another station in life they would normally not encounter, at least not personally, intimately. ‘Others’ are ambivalent packages of preconceptions, clothed in attitudes that range from the fearful and despised to admiration, envy and glamour. The camera, in this case, is the spiritual guide, the drala, the angel of annunciation. Without the camera there would be no way for these two men to meet, to stare for a moment into the lens of the camera which is connected through the optic nerve to the heart. As the shutter clicks the conceptions scatter and a new reality, even a new world, is born.” 

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SÃO PAULO: INVISIBLE CITY

Text and photos: Bia Ferrer
“ It’s dawn, but São Paulo never sleeps completely. The photo reveals a place at the same time living and dormant. Like Gotham City, the fictional town created by DC Comics, anyone from any city belongs to it. [...] This city is São Paulo. But it could be any big metropolis, we can’t distinguish. We know only that it’s night. It’s night in Gotham…” 

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INSIDE OUT SÃO PAULO: SHARED HUMANITY (Portuguese only)

Texto e fotos: João Macul
“Favela do Moinho was half destroyed by the fire in 2011. Many people who lived there are now homeless and many are traumatized by the fire that destroyed the favela. Dona Zefa, for example, has a suitcase with her “essential kit” at the door of her shed. Some people died. Among the victims, human beings; among those blamed by the fire, neglect and speculation. The day ended with cold and we returned from Moinho with some portraits and many stories. I carry with me a more ample portrait of humankind, a reality that goes much beyond our safe homes and the balconies of the city big apartments.” 

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ON ABSTRACT ART AND NATURAL CREATIVITY (M)

Text and images: Dzigar Kongtrül Rinpoche
“Even if we aspire to enlightenment, if we don’t appreciate and trust the potential and expression of our natural creativity—which is all phenomena—and we look for enlightenment elsewhere, our spiritual path will become dualistic. It is an egoistic tendency to try to arrange phenomena according to our preferences rather than appreciate them for what they are. This approach leads us to resent certain experiences and search for an enlightenment—or a creativity—divorced from what we directly encounter. Resenting experience is resenting the natural vitality of mind and prevents us from having a trust in the fullness of the way phenomena unfold. So we need to see this primordial potential in all of our experiences.” 

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FACE TO FACE WITH ALLEN GINSBERG*

Text: Allen Ginsberg interviewed by Jeremy Isaacs; transcript: The Allen Ginsberg Estate; drawing: Allen Ginsberg; photo: Cliff Fyman
“I saw Bob Dylan a couple of weeks ago and he was saying… ‘Who owns all the money? Who owns the media?’. As he travels around the world, he notices that all the media change their story every week, and someone is directing that. And ‘Who owns all the money?’, he was saying. And it was like he knew that he had a great deal of power, to influence people’s psyches, or minds, or thinking, or psychology, or opinion-ation, and yet his power was miniscule, compared to the power of the moguls of the media. And in America it’s only 22 people who run… who own… 80 percent of the mass-media, so that the… it would be very difficult for a poem… for a poet… to overcome that barrage of bullshit. On the other hand, poetry is the only place where you get an individual person telling his subjective truth, what he really thinks, as distinct from what he wants people to think he thinks.”
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(*) English version: because of copyright issues, only some pages have an English version.

JUST ONE BREATH: THE PRACTICE OF POETRY AND MEDITATION* (M)

Text: Gary Snyder; image: Marcos Calatroni; photos: Allen Ginsberg
“Unformed people delight in the gaudy and in novelty. Cooked people delight in the ordinary.” This plainness, this ordinary actuality, is what Buddhists call thusness, or tathata. There is nothing special about actuality because it is all right here. There’s no need to call attention to it, to bring it up vividly and display it. Therefore the ultimate subject matter of a “mystical” Buddhist poetry is profoundly ordinary. This elusive ordinary actuality that is so touching and refreshing, all rolled together in imagination and language, is the work of all the arts.

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THOUGHTS ARE THINGS: THE HEART SUTRA FOR CHILDREN

Text: John Pappas; illustrations: Ed Cross
The Heart Sutra is chanted daily in many Buddhist temples and private homes and is a standard in the Mahayana tradition. It is often chanted in a monotonous manner with each syllable equaling one beat. While this creates a wonderful experience when chanting in a group, it falls short when a parent wishes to impart this particular concept to their children. This version by John Pappas, illustrated by Ed Cross, tries to create a reading experience that would be more enjoyable to children and parent. Something that can be sung and danced to in childish vigor and intensity.

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NOTHING IS TRUE: WILLIAM BURROUGHS AND BUDDHISM (M)

Text: James Grauerholz; photos: Allen Ginsberg & Gary Mark Smith
“William Burroughs was not a Buddhist: he never sought or found a ‘teacher,’ he never took refuge, and he never undertook any bodhisattva vows. He did not consider himself a Buddhist, nor, for that matter, did he ever declare himself a follower of any one faith or practice. But he did have an awareness of the essentials of Buddhism, and in his own way, he was affected by the Buddha-dharma.”

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THE GREAT EASTERN SUN: A CHILDHOOD RECOLLECTION

Text: Monty McKeever; photo: Lee Weingrad; illustrations: Peter Cross
“Trungpa Rinpoche was an amazing teacher. What made him so amazing was how he expressed the timeless wisdom of Tibetan Buddhism through the warmth and brilliance of unconditional love for his students. Despite our various neuroses, he had this joyful, kind, unshakeable confidence in our inherent wakefulness, in the basic goodness of all human beings. The power of this love transformed our lives. It inspired confidence in us that no matter what difficulties we face, sanity, kindness, humor, and love are always available. The “Great Eastern Sun” was what he called this constant source of radiance and brilliance. Great because we are all bigger than our habitual pettiness. East in the sense that the eastern sun is always rising; there is always forward vision available to us, an ever present resource. Sun because this inherent wisdom illuminates the darkness of ignorance, warms up the cold, cowardly, lonely heart. This wasn’t theory. It was not abstract. This was what it felt like being in his presence, being a student of his.” (Acharya Norbu McKeever)
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THE COLOR OF THE SKY (M)

Text: Andy Karr; photos: Michael Wood
“What does it mean to say that you know the color of the sky? Well, everyone knows the sky is blue. But what does that mean? When you look at the sky, it is never just one color, even though we give its many colors just one name. When the sky is clear, it is always a range of blues. Some parts are lighter shades of blue, and others are deeper shades. As the day progresses the color of the sky will change. When there are clouds in the sky, the colors will be different still. When we say that we know the color of the sky, this knowing could be either a thought or label, or it could be the direct experience of seeing the sky. [...] Contemplative photography is a method for working with mind and eye. It is training that helps you to know things directly, and make images without contrivance.”

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HERE COMES EVERYBODY: TWO CONVERSATIONS WITH JOHN CAGE (M)

Text: John Cage, Laurie Anderson, Alan K. Anderson & Robert Coe; photos: Zsolt Zsoló Kóté
“I’m afraid of education now. It’s the same fear I have of government, because I think the two are very much in cahoots—along with the law, which is wrong. The law is clearly wrong because it makes decisions in favor of the rich, and it doesn’t like poverty. And curiously, it’s on the opposite side of the fence from all these teachings which are on the side of poverty, if we can talk in those terms. That’s why I was already given to the acceptance of noise in terms of silence. So, regardless of how noisy the traffic is, it doesn’t disturb the silence. I’ve been asked to work with children and their teachers in the field of music, in France. And I don’t teach; it’s not my practice, so how can I do it? The secret is that I have to find a way not to teach, and find out what they can know.”
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MEDITATION (M)

Text: Chögyam Trungpa; photos: Zsolt Zsoló Kóté
“In looking at the role of sitting meditation practice in artistic perception, we should try to understand how the practice of meditation changes the way you relate with your world: how it changes your visual system, your hearing system, and your speaking as well. The way you look at somebody depends on your confidence and on how much you want to look at such a person. When you project your voice, it is quite clear to what degree you are willing to expose yourself. So I would like to make it quite clear that what we are talking about is not purely aesthetics. A lot of artists are trying to present something beautiful and nice, flowery, polite. But we are not trying to be overly polite or aesthetic— or, for that matter, overly rude. The idea is that the way we behave and the way we work with our sense perceptions comes from simple and straightforward Buddhism. You could call it buddha nature.”
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POWER DUOS: JOSH SHENK ON THE GENIUS OF CREATIVE ALLIANCES (M)

Text: Steve Silberman & Joshua Wolf Shenk
“Our best ideas emerge in dialogue with others’ ideas. What are the implications of this notion of the multiple nature of self for psychotherapy, which often focuses exclusively on the individual?” “the implications are profound and fundamental — not only for psychotherapy, but for our way of addressing when things go wrong in human life, as well as when things go right. Our models of medicine and mental health are obsessively focused on the individual. We’ve come to believe that virtually everything we need to know about us can be located inside our skulls, like we’re spacemen floating around alone. Of course people have internal and individual problems. But most of what affects us has to do with relationships and how they’re working or not working. The idea of fixing the brain chemistry of the individual with medication is fine as far as it goes, but the quickest and most powerful way to affect the brain is through interpersonal chemistry — positive, helpful, affirming, mutual exchanges.”
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THE CONTEMPLATING TEACHER, 2 (M) 

Text: Lee Worley; photos: Zsolt Zsoló Kóté
“Teaching tools can be learned, but the mind and heart that use them only come through developing loving kindness toward ourselves and the willingness to share the tender heart of sadness and aloneness with others. Cultivation of this presence will inevitably suggest tools for contemplative learning that will be the most effective ones for the moment. And, should they fail to have the desired effect, this same loving kindness and fearless confidence allows us to drop the day so that we relate to tomorrow with a fresh start. Practicing with sincerity and the aspiration to become kind is contemplative action. Taking the long view is taking a contemplative view.”
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THE CONTEMPLATING TEACHER, 1

Text: Lee Worley; photos: Zsolt Zsoló Kóté
“ ‘Contemplative education’ is becoming an increasingly popular term in higher education in the United States. This doesn’t surprise me. Thirty years ago Chögyam Trungpa, a Tibetan meditation master who had been transplanted to this country, identified what wasn’t working in our educational system and as a consequence founded Naropa Institute. He perceived that education must speak to and train the whole person, body, mind and spirit and also train the body, mind and spirit’s relationship to its environment on as broad a scale as possible. This was true then and now and will continue to be true as we move further into the 21st century. Surprisingly it has taken American education some time to acknowledge this need for an education that transcends factual information within discreet areas of expertise and instead focuses on radically transforming the whole being and his or her world. ‘This is learning that includes reflection as well as analysis, focus on personal growth as well as skill mastery, developing tolerance for ambiguity, openness to reframing, imagination as a way of understanding as important as rational argument.’ While the mainstream may take time to catch up, at Naropa University and elsewhere this approach is gaining attention. The question is, how can we deliver such an education?”
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WHITE LINES

Text & music: David M. Smith; photo: Corey N. M. Kohn
“For many years I suffered from the delusion that somehow there could be a way around the Buddha’s first noble truth. That if I could just arrange the conditions of my life in just the right way that I could experience pleasure and avoid pain, most if not all of the time. I sought refuge through the use of drugs, alcohol, sex, praise, fame and any other object or substance that resulted in immediate gratification. I would cling to and crave after them constantly and consistently, believing that this would bring permanent happiness or pleasure. In many ways I was addicted to the experience of pleasure. This constant craving that the Buddha points to in the teaching of dependant origination was ultimately the cause of all my suffering. Paradoxically, chasing after pleasure to avoid pain resulted in so much suffering that I finally had to surrender to the truth. I had to defy the lie that I had long told myself. The song ‘White Lines’ is a song about pain and redemption. It represents a full admission and recognition of the first noble truth — that in this life there is suffering.”
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THE FUTURE OF SCIENCE… IS ART?, 2 (M)

Text: Jonah Lehrer; photos: Kimbell Art Museum/Corbis; The Bridgeman Art Library/Getty Images; Francis G. Mayer/Corbis
“The sciences must recognize that their truths are not the only truths. No single area of knowledge has a monopoly on knowledge. As Karl Popper, an eminent defender of science wrote, “It is imperative that we give up the idea of ultimate sources of knowledge, and admit that all knowledge is human; that it is mixed with our errors, our prejudices, our dreams, and our hopes; that all we can do is to grope for truth even though it is beyond our reach.” The struggle for scientific truth is long and hard and never ending. If we want to get an answer to our deepest questions—the questions of who we are and what everything is—we will need to draw from both science and art, so that each completes the other.”
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THE FUTURE OF SCIENCE… IS ART?, 1

Text: Jonah Lehrer; photos: Christie’s Images/Corbis; The M.C. Escher Company;Alinari Archives/Corbis
“What is everything? And who are we? Before we can unravel these mysteries, our sciences must get past their present limitations. How can we make this happen? My answer is simple: Science needs the arts. We need to find a place for the artist within the experimental process, to rediscover what Bohr observed when he looked at those cubist paintings. The current constraints of science make it clear that the breach between our two cultures is not merely an academic problem that stifles conversation at cocktail parties. Rather, it is a practical problem, and it holds back science’s theories. If we want answers to our most essential questions, then we will need to bridge our cultural divide. By heeding the wisdom of the arts, science can gain the kinds of new insights and perspectives that are the seeds of scientific progress.”
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FEMININE PRINCIPLE AND THEORY U (M)

Text: Arawana Hayashi; photos: Zsolt Sütő
“Hanging out without answers or a plan can be scary, and presencing might seem like a waste of time. Paying attention to the space and to the feeling quality in the room could be seen as wasting time, particularly if there is a disproportionate value given to jumping around, fixing people and doing things. Feminine principle is all about empty, open, agenda-less time and space. This approach asks us to trust that human beings individually and collectively have wisdom. In fact, we could say that people have all the wisdom they need to solve the world’s problems. As change agents we therefore create situations in which this wisdom naturally comes forth.”
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THE SPACE BETWEEN: THE THEATER LEGACY OF CHÖGYAM TRUNGPA, 2 (M)

Text: Lee Worley; photos: Nina Maria Mudita
“Perhaps the compassion of space awareness as it is transmitted through the theater methods and plays of Chögyam Trungpa requires a bigger understanding of the meaning of compassion than our busy lives usually give us time to ponder. This training is not seductive, kind, and gentle, and neither are these plays. In both, however, there is a sense of dignity arising from their unyieldingness. We are not being talked down to; we are asked to raise our consciousness up and out to include the highest understanding that exists. Whether we are actor or audience, Chögyam Trungpa expects no less from us than our ability to understand the totality of the situation, the inclusiveness of everything, neurosis and sanity all at once. We can be both the performer and the audience simultaneously if we bring unconditional compassion—compassion without a reference point—to what is happening all the time.”
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IMPOSSIBLE HAPPINESS: AN ELEGY FOR PETER ORLOVSKY (Portuguese only)

Text: Steve Silberman; photos: Cliff Fyman
“Peter died of lung cancer at the Vermont Respite House in Williston on Sunday morning, May 30, 2010, surrounded by old friends like poet Anne Waldman, co-founder of the Jack Kerouac School. Chuck wrote to me shortly after Peter died: ‘Despite becoming more and more reliant on oxygen, Peter was a dedicated member of the small St. Johnsbury meditation center, and a frequent participant at celebrations and major events at Karme Choling. He had a meditation instructor, and looked forward to getting copies of each new book of the Vidyadhara’s teachings as they were published. He enjoyed receiving letters and calls from old friends. Even though he did not write in the later years, Peter noticed everything going on around him, using the poet’s mind which Allen found so naturally present.’ Goodbye little Peter, gentle Peter. Never will I forget how sweet you were.”
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THE SPACE BETWEEN: THE THEATER LEGACY OF CHÖGYAM TRUNGPA, 1

Text: Lee Worley; photos: Nina Maria Mudita
“Things are not only one way at all. There is a certain ambiguity that plays between our hopeful expectation that things will make sense and the ridiculous way things seem to appear. Nothing is spelled out for us, yet we continually suspect a message; by clinging to the anticipated message, we make our neurosis spin faster. Chögyam Trungpa once described his theater training as ‘harnessing the wild horses of neurosis.’ As in the practice of Zen koans, we wear out our conceptual frameworks until space, which has been there all along, miraculously appears.”
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WHY I MAKE MUSIC

Text & songs: Heather Marie Philipp; photos: Marvin Ross & Corey N. M. Kohn
“I make music and sing because it unleashes a whole world of elemental experience that resonates inside the echo chambers of this soul… and hopefully that one — if only to say, ‘See, we are both human and loving with longing and hope,’ like smiling at a stranger in a crowd. Those smiles are small doses of hope that instill faith in what we have. The world as I see it could use a little more of that every chance it gets. Peace starts right here. I am blessed by so much music. My hope is that something I write and offer touches even just one heart outside of mine in a powerful way. Just one, and I’ll have honored all of the path I have walked and songs I’ve been given to sing. That’s why.”

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WHEN THE DRAGON SWALLOWED THE SUN: CONVERSATION WITH DIRK SIMON

Why hasn’t Tibet been freed? Who is keeping the movement from going forward? Seven years in the making, When the Dragon swallowed the Sun is a ground breaking documentary that takes a closer look at these questions in a quest to understand why the world is still dealing with unsettled issues like the Tibetan cause and what can really be done to eradicate them. Dharma/Arte will host on April 13, 2010 a conversation with director Dirk Simon. We’ll talk about his experience in the seven years he’s dedicated to making the film, the Tibetan issue and the importance of cinema and art for us to understand and discuss history, as well as his role in a culture of peace.
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CELEBRATION AND COMMITMENT: JAKUSHO KWONG-ROSHI AND CHÖGYAM TRUNGPA

Video: Bill Scheffel; text: John Pappas, Bill Scheffel & Allen Ginsberg; photos: Nina Mudita & Bill Scheffel
On April 4th, in 1987, “Chogyam Trungpa passed into nirvana. […] The anniversary of Chögyam Trungpa’s death is at once a time to venerate the past, to celebrate the continuity of the teachings in the present, and to commit myself to the preservation and propagation of dharma in the future. […] When we celebrate the day that a great teacher died and passed into nirvana, it is not like relatives worshipping an ancestor or expressing their nostalgia and grief for a departed loved one. This day is about appreciating the gifts we have been given in this era: the practice of meditation and the ability to understand our minds and experience through the insight gained from practice. This day is about applying those gifts, and it is about making a gift of our own practice for the benefit of others.”

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SPOKES IN THE WHEEL

Drawings: Jeff Wigman; text: John Pappas
The Buddha presented a causal chain of activity spurred on by greed, hate and ignorance that is responsible for the endless cycle of suffering. Once realized and understood, this chain was capable of being broken and the cycle ended. Each link, the nidanas, is a link in a causal chain that leads to rebirth and suffering. They also represent hope that cessation of any point of the chain breaks the cycle and leads to liberation.

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CRAZY WISDOM

Video: Kate Linhardt; text: Helena Patsis-Bolduc; drawings: Allen Ginsberg
After watching Crazy wisdom, documentary film by Kate Linhardt, Helena Patsis-Bolduc shares her recollections of meeting Allen Ginsberg and Chögyam Trungpa. The film portraits the history of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics at Naropa University and how it brought Buddhist teachings to its curriculum. It also discusses the challenges faced by Naropa after 35 years. It includes interviews with students and teachers, and excerpts of films like Fried shoes, cooked diamonds, documentary about Naropa produced in 1978.

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VISIONS OF SUSTAINABILITY (Portuguese only)

Text: Fabiana Nardi; photos: Fabiana Nardi/Masterson Photo
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GIVING (excerpt) (M)

Text: Chögyam Trungpa; photos: Thea Boldt
“Giving and opening oneself is not particularly painful, when you begin to do it. But the idea of giving and opening is very painful. When you are asked to give, to take a leap, it feels terrible. You don’t want to do it, although you are somewhat tickled by the idea. ‘‘Maybe I’ll make some kind of breakthrough or maybe I’ll lose everything.’’ Let’s go along with that inquisitive mind and give, open further, open completely! Sooner or later we’re going to do it, so the sooner the better. I hope this is not too complicated. Basically the only thing we are discussing is giving. It is quite simple: giving and the absence of aggression. Once you give, once you open your eyes and ears and everything is completely cleaned up, when everything has been seen through completely, the end result is a sudden experience of precision.”

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ART AS SPIRITUAL PRACTICE (M)

Text: Meredith Monk; photos: Erin Koch
“As an artist, you’re dealing with this fear every time you begin a new piece because you’re allowing yourself to tolerate hanging out in the unknown. Basically, it’s like a blank canvas, you’re starting from nothing, from not knowing anything. Every time you make a piece, fear is always there and you’re always working with it, playing with it, allowing the interest and curiosity of what you’re making to become more compelling than the anxiety. Then you’ve actually walked through the fear and there’s a sense of discovery.”

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SPONTANEOUS INTELLIGENCE: INTERVIEW WITH ALLEN GINSBERG (Portuguese only) (M)

Text and drawings: Allen Ginsberg; photos: Peter Orlovsky, Rachel Homer & Cynthia MacAdams
“Well, I think everybody has a natural inclination to compassion. It gets covered over by frustration, ignorance, bad experiences, bad karma, but underneath it, as they say, everybody has a Buddha-nature which is compassionate. This is exactly the opposite of the Hobbesian view, which is that underneath everybody is a snarling animal. This negative view is basically behind a lot of the neoconservative and even liberal philosophies. The Buddhist thing is pure gold in a way. I don’t think it’s been tapped yet popularly as a source of encouragement, as an inspiration, politically or personally. Everybody’s got a life to lead and they’ve got a bodhisattva tendency, everybody wants to do good, so I just think on a personal level, yeah. On a larger scale, there doesn’t seem to be any hope unless compassion becomes a more widespread important teaching on how to live. Compassion to self and others.”
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KYUDO: KANJURO SHIBATA SENSEI, THE XX IMPERIAL BOWMAKER TO THE EMPEROR OF JAPAN (Portuguese only)

Text and photos: Scott Spanbauer
Shibata Sensei was increasingly disturbed by changes in Japanese society – a turn toward materialism that was rapidly changing kyudo from a meditative art into a sport. Rather than practicing kyudo as a way of “cleaning the mind,” many students, especially those he taught at a local university, were intent on hitting the target. To this day, Sensei constantly exhorts his students to practice “mind kyudo, not sports kyudo,” and to give up hope and fear regarding hitting the target. The emphasis on winning prevalent in Japan led him to accept an invitation by Trungpa Rinpoche in 1980 to teach in the West. Moving emphasis away from shake, or form, he increasingly points out how students can mix mind with meditation.

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THE ZEN AND THE WARRIOR (Portuguese only)

Text: Meredith Monk, Frans Krajcberg, Ernane Guimarães Neto & Teixeira Coelho; photos: Henrique Raucci
A conversation between Meredith Monk and Brazilian artist Frans Krajcberg, during Meredith Monk’s visit to Brazil, in November 2008.
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THE DRALA PRINCIPLE, 2: LUXURY IS EXPERIENCING REALITY (M)

Text and photos: Bill Scheffel
“When we realize ‘luxury is experiencing reality,’ simplifying is not a hardship but something natural — and natural things tend to do very well if they are allowed to. Simplifying provides the ground to risk. Most of us in the first world have far more resources available to us than the vast majority of humanity. We not only have the possibility but the responsibility to risk some of our so-called security for benefit of finding and taking our seat and in turn, helping others. If we are unwilling to simply risk, renounce our privileges and assume responsibility it is unlikely it would occur to us to supplicate for a vision, much less receive one. What is vision? It is the truth of the human heart, which exists in nowness outside of time and can never be discovered through hope and fear.”

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THE DRALA PRINCIPLE, 1: UNLIMITED FIELDS OF PERCEPTION

Text: Bill Scheffel; photos: Bill Scheffel & Devin Scheffel
“In the drala teachings, each of the senses is considered an ‘unlimited field of perception’ in which there are sights, sounds and feelings ‘we have never experienced before’ — no one has ever experienced! Each sense moment, if we are present for it, is a gate into the elemental wisdom of the world. Every perception is a pure perception; from the feel of a meager pebble stuck in our shoe to the meow of a house cat. Through this kind of perception we discover that we live in a vast, singular and unexplored world.”
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CREATING THE CONTAINERS FOR GROUP INSIGHT

Text: Michael Chender; photos: Douglas Dickel
“Working with complex challenges (not susceptible to engineered or traditionally managed solutions), which characterizes what we all now face on many levels, demands new ways of engaging, as represented by the U-process, dialogue, systems thinking. However, to be most effective in working with these, one needs to fully appreciate and access the ‘view’ that lies behind them, something rarely made explicit within these practices. That view, of interdependence, constant change, no fixed points of judgement, and so on is powerful and inspiring, but hard to truly take on because we are so habituated to operating in different ways.  So to do so, we need a personal ‘practice’ of this view.  We could also call this a practice of becoming authentic.”
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ACTION, COMPASSION, CREATIVITY

Text: Margot Becker; photos: Margot Becker & Douglas Dickel
“Giving up my creative disciplines caused me to turn my creative energies to a mundane yet still fascinating level, a level that manifested not in novels and dances but in simple acts that are perhaps a mere few seconds, a second, or less. Being aware and maybe, if I can catch the wave just as it curls over the lip, catching a bit of a ride. Eventually, if one practiced enough, one might be able to make a better choice in that small, eternal moment, write it on a more permanent page than paper, and that piece of writing might have an affect on… someone… sometime… somewhere…”

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THE SYMBOLISM OF EXPERIENCE (M)

Text: Chögyam Trungpa; photos: Douglas Dickel
“The topic of symbolism is not just for artists or art historians, but for people who would like to understand and develop themselves. The goal is not to teach lots of gimmicks, but to help you understand something about yourself, your view of life, and of the phenomenal world in general. In turn, you might understand how to apply that viewpoint audio-visually as well. Symbolism is based on what we experience personally and directly in our lives. Every activity is basic symbolism. The universe is constantly trying to reach us to say something or teach something, but we are rejecting it all the time.”

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SACRED THEATER (M)

Text: Lee Worley; photos: Douglas Dickel
“Regardless of differences in their styles and in the content of their work, what is consistent among the ideas of these theatrical leaders is that the performance, led by the actors, endeavors to engage in a process of transformation of actors and/or of audience. The mission of sacred theater both Asian and Western, traditional or innovative, is to act as a transformative vehicle.”
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NEGATIVE CAPABILITY: KEROUAC’S BUDDHIST ETHIC
+ Não cabe, Cigarra, Cicatriz, Pesadelo e Sonho, visual poems by Marcelo Sahea

Text: Allen Ginsberg; visual poems by Marcelo Sahea
“It is possible to take our existence as a ‘sacred world,’ to take this place as open space rather than claustrophobic dark void. It is possible to take a friendly relationship to our ego natures, it is possible to appreciate the aesthetic play of forms in emptiness, and to exist in this place like majestic kings of our own consciousness. But to do that, we would have to give up grasping to make everything come out the way we daydream it should. […] This is where I think Kerouac got caught as a Catholic, ultimately, because I don’t think he overcame that fear of the First Noble Truth.”

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UNBENDING INTENT: AN INTERVIEW WITH PHILIP GLASS (Portuguese only)

Text: Philip Glass & Helen Tworkov; photos: François Bouchet & Jean-Pierre Dalbéra
Philip Glass talks about Gandhi, art, Buddhism, Christianity, social justice and compassion.
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DHARMA OR DRAMA: THE ART OF BEING WHO WE ARE (Portuguese only)
+ “Smoking feminino risca-de-giz de Yves Saint-Laurent e o grafismo
da pintura corporal indígena Kaiapó-Xikrin do Cateté”
+ “Discovering Elegance”, by Chögyam Trungpa

Text: Rodrigo Bueno; images: Rodrigo Bueno, Bruno Galan & Douglas Garcia; photos: Douglas Garcia & Andrea Roth
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PEOPLE, 2

Photos: Henrique Raucci
Photos from Dharma/Arte’s events.
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GLIMPSES OF SPACE: THE GIFT OF FEMININE PRINCIPLE 
+ “The Chicken and the Egg”, by Chögyam Trungpa

Text and photos: Alice Haspray
“What is the gift of feminine principle in our world?  How do we receive that gift? That feminine energy may be misunderstood, ignored, or feared, has deep significance for the lives of both men and women and for any aspirations we have to create a better world.”
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PEOPLE, 1

Photos: Henrique Raucci & Rodrigo Almeida Prado
Photos from Dharma/Arte’s events.
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BRAZILIAN EDITION OF TRUE PERCEPTION: THE PATH OF DHARMA ART (Portuguese only)

Dharma/Arte
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BASIC GOODNESS (excerpt) (M)

Chögyam Trungpa
“The purpose of dharma art is to overcome aggression. If your mind is preoccupied with aggression, you cannot function properly. On the other hand, if your mind is preoccupied with passion, there are possibilities.”
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DHARMA, ART AND CREATIVITY (Portuguese only)

Text: Dharma/Arte; fotos/photos: Henrique Raucci & Andrea Roth
A text presenting the mission of Dharma/Arte.
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